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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued: so-called investigation were ever punished. That is an illustration of the kind of abuse you can expect to arise in a program that watches everyone all the time just like big brother. It does cost a lot of money but unfortunately few members of Congress know how much it costs because it’s part of the so-called black budget, the part of the budget that is kept secret even from members of Congress, it is safe to say that it cost billions upon billions of dollars for us to be watching us, an activity that the Constitution forbids because there is no probable cause and no particularity and it needs to (stop).
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
The Amash Conyers amendment was a bipartisan effort to rein in the NSA and to stop domestic surveillance that’s in violation of the Constitution. I voted for it. I lobbied my colleagues very heavily for it. I was responsible for the drafting of the letter, a dear colleague letter, that I personally circulated to literally a couple of hundred of my colleagues on the floor of the house. I made the argument in favor of respecting the
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued 1A: constitution and respecting the rights of Americans to their own privacy. The amendment just barely failed. I think we will see it again. I’m sure we’ll see something like it again. It simply would have inserted an order into each FISA order, a single sentence into each FISA order, that the court issues reminding people that domestic surveillance is unconstitutional without probable cause.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson: They are saying that sometimes during the course of the investigation some of this unconstitutional data was consulted. They are not saying it prevented the terrorist attacks at all. They are not saying they would not have otherwise been able to disrupt them with the information they had. That is exactly what is wrong with this. The so-called intelligence community is making these rabid, hysterical claims that in order to keep us safe, we have to spy on ourselves. There are some people who find that convincing. I think it defies common sense and i don't buy it at all.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Caller: for standing up for the constitution. Please carry on. Grayson: thank you. It’s very important to me to make sure that we don’t see the militarization of American life. In fact, that is exactly what Osama bin Laden was trying to bring about. He didn’t believe he could destroy enough tall buildings in America in order to do any real damage. What he thought was that we’d turn on each other. And I’m doing my best to prevent that.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Grayson continued 1B:I think it is sad. Everyone must recognize that it’s sad that we are perpetually at war. That was the excuse in 1984 for the pervasive domestic surveillance that was depicted by George Orwell in that book. The fact that those countries were constantly at war gave an excuse for the leaders of those countries to engage in pervasive domestic surveillance. The same thing could become true in America. I’m doing whatever I can to stop it.
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 08/01/2013
Greenwald: A tool designed to collect nearly everything a user does on the internet. it's designed to collect that and store it into databases. The database you're talking about with XKEYSCORE has 41 billion internet records stored each and every month for a 30 day period. What is different about it, is that unlike surveillance under the FISA court, the analyst
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 08/01/2013
Greenwald continued: sits at his or her desk and search for things when they don't even know the person they're searching for. They can search just by general key word or they search e-mail accounts for certain words or search user browser histories or Google searches for names and then they start assigning suspicion to people and then tracking them. So it has nothing really to do with the FISA court. Remember, the FISA court is necessary only when you're targeting a US person. This database does contain lots of communications of US persons but it's done completely independent of the FISA court.
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 08/01/2013
Greenwald continued 2: that building a massive surveillance state without serious checks and oversight will lead to abuse. That was the lesson of the Church committee, that for decades the United States government seriously abused surveillance because nobody was looking over their shoulder to see what it was they were doing. They didn’t have to go to courts and get approval for each individual warrant so They eavesdropped on Martin Luther King and the anti-war movement. and all kinds of political groups for improper purposes. But secondly, as secret as the NSA is, we know there's serious abuse, in 2011,
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 08/01/2013
Greenwald continued 3: there was an 86-page ruling from the FISA court saying what the NSA was doing, systematically violated the constitution and the law. As I said, Ron Wyden just this week got James Clapper to admit there are numerous violations of the law that the NSA is committing and they try to slough it off and say it's not intentional. But Wyden said It's much more serious than the government is letting on. The problem is, it's all done in secret,
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